EgyptAir plane crashes

The following are significant events involving the airline or its subsidiares since 1970. The numbered events are those involving at least one passenger death where the aircraft flight had a direct or indirect role, and where at least one of the dead passengers was not a stowaway, hijacker, or saboteur.

  1. 2 January 1971; EgyptAir Comet4; SU-ALC; flight 844; Tripoli, Libya: The aircraft, which was on a scheduled international flight from Algiers, Algeria to Tripoli, Libya, struck sand dunes four miles (6.4 km) from the runway during approach. Visibility at the time of the crash was below the airline's minimum for a night landing at that airport. All eight crew members and eight passengers were killed.

  2. 2 January 1971; EgyptAir DC9-32; YU-AHR; flight 763; Aden, Yemen: The aircraft, which was on an international charter flight from Cairo, Egypt to Aden, Yemen struck an extinct volcano about seven kilometers (4.4 miles) from the arrival airport. dunes four miles (6.4 km) from the runway during approach. Visibility at the time of the crash was below the airline's minimum for a night landing at that airport. All nine crew members and 21 passengers were killed.
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  3. 29 January 1973; EgyptAir Ilyushin 18; SU-AOV; flight 741; near Nicosia, Cyprus: The aircraft, which was on a scheduled international flight from Cairo, Egypt to Nicosia, Cyprus, crashed into mountain during a night approach. All seven crew members and 30 passengers were killed.
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  4. 25 December 1976; EgyptAir 707; SU-AXA; flight 864; Bangkok, Thailand: The aircraft was on a scheduled international flight from Cairo, Egypt to Bangkok, Thailand. The aircraft crashed into a textile mill about two kilometers from the runway. All nine crew members and 43 passengers were killed. Also killed were 19 people on the ground.
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  5. 23 November 1985; Egyptair 737-200; SU-AYH; flight 648; Valletta, Malta: The aircraft was on a scheduled international flight from Athens, Greece to Cairo, Egypt, when the aircraft was hijacked. A security agent exchanged gunfire with the hijackers, and in the process the fuselage was punctured and the cabin depressurized. The aircraft then diverted to Malta. After several hours of negotiations, Egyptian troops stormed the aircraft. During the ensuing battle, the three hijackers threw several hand grenades. The aircraft was severely damaged by the explosions and fire. A total of two of the six crew members, two of the three hijackers, and 56 of the 89 passengers were killed.
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  6. 10 June 1986; Air Sinai F27; SU-GAD; Cairo, Egypt: The aircraft was on a scheduled domestic flight from Cairo to Alexandria, Egypt, but had to return to the departure airport due to weather conditions at Alexandria. Shortly before landing in reduced visibility, the crew reportedly attempted a go-around maneuver, but lost control of the aircraft and crashed near the runway. All five crew members and 18 of the 21 passengers were killed.

  7. 31 October 1999; EgyptAir 767-300ER; SU-GAP; flight 990; Atlantic Ocean near Nantucket Island, MA: Radar and radio contact with the aircraft was lost shortly after the aircraft departed JFK Airport in New York on a scheduled international flight from New York, NY to Cairo, Egypt. The aircraft crashed into the ocean about 60 miles (96 km) south of Nantucket Island. The NTSB determined that the aircraft departed from controlled flight and crashed into the Atlantic Ocean as a result of flight control inputs by the first officer. All 14 crew members and 203 passengers were killed.
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    22 February 2000; 767-300ER; SU-GAO; EgyptAir Harare, Zimbabwe: The aircraft was on an unscheduled international flight from Johannesburg, South Africa to Harare, Zimbabwe, and the crew was attempting a landing at night in bad weather with strong, gusting winds. The aircraft veered off to the right of the runway, then crossed back over and veered off the left side before the crew regained control and brought the aircraft to a stop on the runway. The aircraft sustained significant damage during the landing, including the separation of the left engine and pylon. None of the 17 crew members or 76 passengers were seriously injured.
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  8. 7 May 2002; EgyptAir 737-500; SU-GBI; flight 843; near Tunis, Tunisia: The aircraft was on a scheduled international flight from Cairo, Egypt to Tunis, Tunisia. The crew was attempting an approach reduced visibility conditions due to fog and sandstorms, and the aircraft crashed into high ground about 6 km (3.8 mi) from the arrival airport. Three of the six crew members and at 11 of the 56 passengers were killed.
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    29 July 2011; EgyptAir; 777-200ER; SU-GBP; flight 667; Cairo, Egypt: The aircraft was preparing to depart on a scheduled international flight from Cairo, Egypt to Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. While at the departure gate and during passenger boarding, an electrical fire broke out in an area beneath the cockpit. The passengers and crew were deplaned, and the fire was extinguished, but not before causing substantial damage to the aircraft. Although the aircraft experienced significant fire and heat damage, none of the ten crew members or 307 passenges were killed.
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  9. 19 May 2016; EgyptAir A320-200; SU-GCC; flight MS804; en route Paris to Cairo: The aircraft was on a scheduled international flight from Paris, France to Cairo, Egypt when radar contact was lost. The aircraft was cruising at 37,000 feet and over the eastern Mediterranean Sea north of the Egyptian coast and crashed into the sea. There were no survivors among the 56 passengers and 10 crew members on board. Three of the crew members were reportedly security personnel.
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Related information
Plane crashes for airlines of the Middle East and Africa

EgyptAir plane crashes
http://www.airsafe.com/events/airlines/egyptair.htm -- Revised: 30 July 2016